Telephone support 7 days a week: 07799 376691

home | contact us | Shopping Basket

birth positions

A birthing pool allows you freedom of movement, which you will probably do instinctively during labour.  

Some of the most common positions Sheila Kitzinger explains in her recent book “The New Pregnancy & Childbirth Choice & Challenges” are as follows:

kneeling slide

Kneel forwards, grasping the rim of the pool with your arms extended. Slide to and fro, lifting your head and bending your arms as you pull forwards and extending your arms as you slide backwards.

squatting and forwards slide

Squat in the water with your arms and shoulders supported by the rim of the pool, feet well apart so that your pelvis is at it’s widest. Slide down with your legs extended, and back up to a squatting position again.

At the height of the contraction it may feel good to turn over on your front and drop your head into the water and blow out.

Lift your head as you pull forwards and. slide back with your arms extended.

squatting and backwards slide

Squat in the centre of the pool, knees wide apart, arms extended and holding the rim of the pool. Drop your body forwards and extend your legs behind you. Grasp your partner at waist level, while he supports your upper arms.

forwards and backwards slide on front

Kneel in the water with your arms supported by the rim of the pool. Keep your knees well apart so that your pelvis is at its widest.   Then slide down in the water with your legs extended. Push with   your feet against the side of the pool to get back up to a kneeling position.

forward and backwards slide on back

With arms spread wide and supported by the pool rim, sit with your legs across the width of the pool so that your feet are resting on the opposite side.
Slide forwards and backwards, using your feet against the side of the pool to propel you. Padding behind your neck may make you more comfortable.

supported kneel

Kneel leaning forwards, knees wide apart, with the rim of the pool under your arms.  In this position the cervix is tilted forwards, which is helpful during the second stage of labour.

head cradled float

Lie back in the water with your head cradled in your partner’s hands. He should use a light touch, so that you can still move your head quite freely when you wish.

One position a woman may like to adopt as she pushes the baby down is a supported squat, her upper back against the side of the pool and her partner’s arms under her shoulders. It is important that he does not press on the nerves under her arms and that he holds her securely without gripping her.